Standard Issue featuring Special Section of Interviews on Neoliberalism, Media and Power (July 2016)

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Networking Knowledge – Journal of the MeCCSA-PGN, Vol 9, No 5 (2016)

Standard Issue featuring Special Section of Interviews on Neoliberalism, Media and Power

Featuring articles from Amanda Starling Gould, Carol Macgillivray, Jane Birkin, Leah Jerop Komen and Isla-Kate Morris; a review essay from Christoph Raetzsch; reports from Abigail Blyth and Craig Hamilton; and interviews with Des Freedman, Terry Flew and Sean Phelan as part of a special section on neoliberalism, media and power.

Full issue available open access here: http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/issue/view/55

 

Interview: Media, Migration and the Borders of Fortress Europe: An Interview with David Morley

david morley‘Media, Migration and the Borders of Fortress Europe: An Interview with David Morley’

Sara Marino, Simon Dawes, David Morley

In this interview, David Morley addresses the contemporary European refugee ‘crisis’, the representation of the ‘migrant’ and the increasing securitisation of Europe’s borders in terms of a crisis in European political identity. Looking back on several of his own publications, as well as the work of those who have influenced him and his time as a student in the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies in Birmingham, Morley discusses the links between geopolitics and communications, and between the virtual and material realms, as well as the contemporary significance of mobility and re-territorialisation for understanding the causes of and responses to the current ‘crisis’. Reflecting on the imperial past and uncertain future of Europe, he argues for the need to be alert for positive political opportunities within moments of disjuncture and crisis, and for an emphasis on developing new modes of everyday living.

Available open access here: http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/452

Special Issue: Fortress Europe: Media, Migration and Borders

image potere1‘Fortress Europe: Media, Migration and Borders’ (Networking Knowledge, 9.4)

Special Issue co-edited with Sara Marino, and featuring articles by Sara Marino, Alexander Callum Harrison, Yasmin Ibrahim & Anita Howarth, Joshua Synenko, Inês Vieira, Carolina Silveira, Martin R. Herbers, and Donya Alinejad, as well as an interview with David Morley.

Available open access here: http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/issue/view/54

 

Just Because You Write about Posthumanism Doesn’t Mean You Aren’t a Liberal Humanist: An Interview with Gary Hall

gary hall

Just Because You Write about Posthumanism Doesn’t Mean You Aren’t a Liberal Humanist: An Interview with Gary Hall

Francien Broekhuizen, Simon Dawes, Danai Mikelli, Poppy Wilde

 

Abstract

In this follow-up interview to his keynote lecture at the MeCCSA-PGN 2015 Conference in Coventry, Gary Hall discusses the processes of neoliberal subjectivation and the metricisation of the academy. Arguing that most media, communication and cultural studies critique tends to focus on the new, self-governing and self-exploitative subjects academics and students are transforming into rather than the scholarly subjectivities they are changing from, Hall maintains that both the new neoliberal model (associated with corporate social and mobile media) and the liberal humanist model (associated with conventional print-on-paper publishing) are involved in the subordination of scholarly agency and consciousness to the pre-programmed, controllable patterns of the capitalist culture industries. Taking in some of the open access initiatives with which he’s involved, the interview addresses both Hall’s account of the processes of neoliberalisation and his experiments with radically different ways of working and thinking as a media theorist and philosopher.

http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/422

 

Transformative Images, Temporality and Infra-structures of Feeling: An Interview with Rebecca Coleman

rebecca coleman

Transformative Images, Temporality and Infra-structures of Feeling: An Interview with Rebecca Coleman

Francien Broekhuizen, Simon Dawes, Danai Mikelli, Poppy Wilde

 

Abstract

In this follow-up interview to her keynote lecture at the MeCCSA-PGN 2015 Conference in Coventry, Rebecca Coleman discusses the affective relations between bodies, images and environments. Coleman offers an overview of her work on images and the body, as well as her interest in theorising the present and the future, and explains her engagement with feminism, new materialism and Deleuze, in particular. To understand how bodies ‘become’, she argues for the need to understand both process, transformation and change, and what stays, sticks or gets stopped.

http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/421

 

Haunted Data, Post-Publication Peer-Review and Body Studies: An Interview with Lisa Blackman

lisa blackman

Haunted Data, Post-Publication Peer-Review and Body Studies: An Interview with Lisa Blackman

Francien Broekhuizen, Simon Dawes, Danai Mikelli, Poppy Wilde

 

Abstract

In this follow-up interview to her keynote lecture at the MeCCSA-PGN 2015 Conference in Coventry, Lisa Blackman discusses her work on affect and the body, as well as her new book Haunted Data, which explores the creative and critical challenges of computational cultures for theories of affect and mediation, and the potential of PPPR (post-publication peer-review) to provide a corpus of data that be re-moved (Rheinberger) and performed for its hauntological potential. Working with the concept of ‘haunted data’ to follow those traces, deferrals, absences, gaps and their movements within a particular corpus of data, and to re-move and keep alive what becomes submerged or hidden by particular regimes of visibility and remembering, Blackman illustrates how these movements are simultaneously technical, affective, historical, social, political and ethical.

http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/420

 

Openness and Opacity: An Interview with Clare Birchall

clare birchall

Openness and Opacity: An Interview with Clare Birchall

Francien Broekhuizen, Simon Dawes, Danai Mikelli, Poppy Wilde

 

Abstract

In this follow-up interview to her keynote lecture at the MeCCSA-PGN 2015 Conference in Coventry, Clare Birchall discusses the “sharing economy”, “shareveillance” and the depoliticised subjectivity shaped by both open and opaque data. In order to re-imagine subjectivity in the face of shareveillance, Birchall calls on Édouard Glissant’s “right to opacity”. Ultimately, she explains how the concept of “sharing” can be politicised as a Commons, while the appropriation of opacity can become a political act. Her reassessment of the politics and values associated with openness and secrecy has implications for media scholars, particularly in terms of the need to think more critically about what kinds of publishing, networks and communications we want to develop.

http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/419