Article: Broadcasting and the Public Sphere: Problematising Citizens, Consumers and Neoliberalism

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Here’s my article ‘Broadcasting and the Public Sphere: Problematising Citizens, Consumers and Neoliberalism’, published in Media, Culture & Society (36.5) in July 2014.

Abstract: Literature on broadcasting regulation in the UK often presents a narrative of decline, from an ethos of public service and citizenship to a neoliberal faith in market logic and the sovereign consumer that undermines the public sphere. Much of this discussion is weakened, however, by a lack of engagement with citizenship and consumption, and the reduction to unitary oppositions of what are actually protean distinctions. This weakness in the literature is particularly problematic when it comes to analysing contemporary changes unreflexively as ‘neoliberal’, because neoliberalism cannot be reduced to the passing of power from the state to the market, or to a simple process of privatisation or individualisation. Rather, neoliberalism involves the changing governmental relation between state and market, and between citizens and consumers. Consequently, engagement with theoretical debates on citizenship, consumption and neoliberalism will be recommended to provide a more sophisticated reading of broadcasting as a public sphere.

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Article: La liberté de la presse, la vie privée et l’espace public (in French)

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This article, ‘La liberté de la presse, la vie privée et l’espace public’, was published in 2014 on the website of the French journal, Raison Publique [libre accès]. It’s a translation of my article ‘Press Freedom, Privacy and the Public Sphere’, published in Journalism Studies (15.1)

Article: Press Freedom, Privacy and the Public Sphere

Journalism Studies_cover

Here’s my article ‘Press Freedom, Privacy and the Public Sphere’, published in Journalism Studies (15.1) in 2014 (first published online in 2013).

Abstract: Taking as its starting point the reduction of the News International phone-hacking scandal to a debate on the balance between privacy and press freedom, this article will argue for the recasting of these rights in terms of their mutual significance for the public sphere. After reviewing the history of the legal approach to balancing these two liberal freedoms from the state, the article will assert that each is incapable of recognising the threats posed to the public and the press by the market. Contrasting the theory of press freedom with the concept of the public sphere, and distinguishing between individual, social and political dimensions of privacy, the article will call for a turn to a civic republican approach to press regulation that would more effectively protect the public from both state and market interference, and empower the media to hold both political and economic power to account.

 

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Book Chapter: Privacy and the Freedom of the Press: A False Dichotomy

Media and Public Shaming_book cover

Here’s a link to the publisher’s page for Julian Petley’s (ed.) Media and Public Shaming: Drawing the Boundaries of Disclosure (published by I.B. Tauris in 2013), which includes my chapter ‘Privacy and the Freedom of the Press: A False Dichotomy’, and below is about half of it reproduced by kind permission of The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and I.B.Tauris.

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